accounting

The Fall of Constantinople for Amazon's Mechanical Turks?

While the Ottoman Turks caused turmoil in the late Middle Ages and the Age of Reformation, Amazon’s Mechanical Turks are causing a turmoil in experimental research at this moment. While early studies documented that Amazon’s Mechanical Turk participants were valid proxies for experimental accounting research, there are increasing concerns about the quality of Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (MTurk) data.

The danger of practical anecdotes

There is a growing trend of using practical anecdotes to signal relevance and importance of experimental research. However, it's important to be cautious about a hidden danger. Read this post to learn more.

How to prevent bots and farms from taking over and ruining your online experiment

In this post, I share simple techniques to filter participants before they take part in your online experiment. These techniques filter bots and participants using automated scripts plus participants who fake their geolocation using VPN/VPS, proxies, and server farms.

Replications can help improve practical relevance of accounting experiments

Both replications and practical relevance are awkward discussion topics for most experimental accounting researchers. Yet, replications offer a concrete way to address concerns we may have about the 'practical relevance' of experimental findings.

Are experiments that recruit from online subject pools field experiments or laboratory experiments?

Experiments that recruit from online participants pools such as MTurk and Prolific have become increasingly popular over the past two decades. However, since scholars have referred to such experiments as both laboratory and field experiments, which classification should we use?

Choosing the right participants for your experiment

Choosing the right participant pool for your experiment is challenging. Which experiments require professional participants? Does it matter whether you recruit students or online participants? In this post, Jeremy Bentley explains his approach to participant pool selection.

Why PEQs do not provide the best process evidence

Post-experimental questionnaires (PEQs) are a popular means of obtaining process evidence in experimental research. However, are they the best method for obtaining such evidence?

Automize testing your experiments with 'bots'

Bots are a powerful yet often overlooked tool that helps experimental researchers test their applications more effectively and efficiently. In this post, Victor van Pelt explains their use and argues that their usefulness may even extend beyond testing.

What do participants think of accounting experiments?

Which design features of accounting experiments contribute the most to participant motivation, participant engagement, and perceived similarity to practice? Bart Dierynck and Victor van Pelt are in the process of providing an empirical answer.